Dan Woods / KRCU

The State of the Race for MO Senate and Governor

Dan Woods sat down with Jason Sides, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, Philosophy & Religion, to talk about the state of the race for governor and U.S. Senate in Missouri.
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KRCU Local Programs & Stories

October is Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month

"A wife who loses a husband is called a widow.
A husband who loses a wife is called a widower.
A child who loses his parents is called an orphan.
There is no word for a parent who loses a child.
That’s how awful the loss is." President Ronald Reagan shared this passage from An Orphan’s Tale in 1988 when he proclaimed October as National Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month. When it comes to this type of loss, many people don’t know what to say, so it is simply not...
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When Rosley Espinoza's daughter was very young, in preschool, she started acting differently. She seemed distracted and would get in trouble at school.

"Lack of interest, teachers' notes coming home with behavior notes," Espinoza says, speaking in Spanish.

She says she asked school officials to evaluate her daughter, Citlali, for special education, but they didn't.

Make no mistake. Gloria Steinem, noted feminist and author, does not see that a woman elected to the White House automatically means a win for feminists or women.

"This is not all about biology, and I think we have to be careful to always say that, because if Sarah Palin were the president it wouldn't signify change," she tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "If President Obama did not represent the majority views of Americans and of African-Americans, he would not represent change as he does. So it isn't about simple biology. It's about what we represent."

To find Mosul's cops, you drive to a gray dot of a village in an endless desert. The village, Mahana, was retaken from the Islamic State a few months ago and for now it's the police base for cops who left Mosul when ISIS took over more than two years ago.

Iraq's army and its allies are now battling their way through rural areas toward the larger prize of retaking Mosul. Helicopters buzz back and forth from the frontlines. Every breath is bitter with smoke from oil wells set alight by ISIS.

Mexico City's Mayor Miguel Angel Mancera is handing out plastic whistles. A half-million of them. At three bucks a pop, he's hoping that women will use the whistles to scare off harassers on the packed public transportation system.

When the plan was announced this summer, it received a flurry of scathing criticism and mocking memes on social media. But city officials are moving forward and have been handing out the whistles by the thousands at subway and bus stops.

It's the land of pop-up protests.

Using hashtags and spur-of-the-moment public demonstrations, Zimbabweans are demanding reforms — and the departure of 92-year-old president Robert Mugabe, who has led the country since its independence from Britain in 1980.

If there's one rule that most parents cling to in the confusing, fast-changing world of kids and media, it's this one: No screens before age 2.

As of today, that rule is out the window.

Whether your kid is 3 and obsessed with Daniel Tiger videos or 15 and spending half her conscious hours on Snapchat, you are probably somewhat conflicted about how to think about their media habits.

How much time? What kind of media? What should our family's rules be?

On Friday the United Nations is set to appoint Wonder Woman its "Honorary Ambassador for the Empowerment of Women and Girls." The cartoon character, turning 75 this year, will be the face of a social media campaign that the U.N., will launch at a star-studded ceremony in New York. The actress Gal Gadot — who plays Wonder Woman in the movies these days — is scheduled to be there. So is Lynda Carter, who portrayed the superhero in the 1970s television show.

Fortunate Nyakupinda has parked her hatchback by the side of the busy main road leading to the industrial area in Harare — where she sells used clothing for men from the trunk and the back seat.

The scene: A half-dozen white corrections officers at Clinton Correctional Facility in Dannemora, N.Y., are confronting an African-American inmate named Leonard Strickland. It's video of a closed world, invisible to most of us.

"Stay on the wall, do you understand me?" officers shout. "Don't move."

Strickland, who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia, appears dazed and unresponsive, and then he collapses.


flickr user: Jdmoar / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jdmoar/

Left Of The Dial #157 - Potter Pulls The Strings

Ophir Kutiel goes by the name Kutiman as a musician and he's a one-man funk band from Tel Aviv, Israel. He also makes audio-collages out of found-sounds from YouTube. His latest album is called 6am. William Tyler has a new album of instrumental guitar music titled Modern Country. Tyler is a member of the bands Lambchop and Silver Jews, and this is his third solo album. It's lush and dynamic, exploring every inch of its defined space. From the desk of bizarre collaborations comes Banks &...
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All Songs TV


As Heard on Fresh Air

How The 'Cannabis Catch-22' Keeps Marijuana Classified As A Harmful Drug

America has a long and storied history with marijuana. Once grown by American colonists to make hemp rope, by 1970, it was classified as a Schedule 1 narcotic. Possession of it was — and is — a federal crime, despite the fact that in recent years 25 states have legalized medical marijuana and four states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis for recreational use.Author John Hudak, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, traces the history of America's laws and attitudes...
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As Heard on the TED Radio Hour

A Father-Daughter Dance — In Prison?

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode How We Love.About Angela Patton's TEDTalkAngela Patton works to help girls and fathers stay connected and in each others' lives — but that becomes harder when the father is in jail. Patton tells the story of a unique father-daughter dance.About Angela PattonAngela Patton is the creator of Camp Diva, which helps support girls ages 11-17. Since its inception, Camp Diva has expanded to offer after-school programs, conferences and other programs and services....
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