Agriculture

Agriculture

Missouri Department of Conservation

The 2017-2018 deer and turkey hunting seasons came to a close on Monday, and the Missouri Department of Conservation has released final harvest numbers for the state.

The season ended on Jan. 15 with 283,940 deer harvested, and the archery deer season closing with 51,722 harvested.

MDC news services coordinator Joe Jerek says they’ve seen a large jump in numbers since last year.

Down on the Farm with the "Turkey Whisperer"

Nov 20, 2017
Brian Noto

Thanksgiving is almost here.

But who knew that our Thanksgiving turkeys are reluctant gobblers.

Brian Noto traveled to Frohna, Missouri, to talk with Colby Jones of Farrar Out Farms a.k.a. "The Turkey Whisperer."

 

Chris Chinn’s first year on the job has not been boring.

Her tenure as director of the Missouri Department of Agriculture began with flooding in the spring that’s now causing delays in crop harvests. Along the way, Chinn’s office had to deal with contamination in southeastern Missouri that triggered a temporary ban of the herbicide Dicamba. It's an issue that caught the attention of the Missouri General Assembly and farmers across the state.

St. Louis Public Radio’s Marshall Griffin caught up with Chinn to talk about those challenges and her department’s major priorities.

Candice Davis/Missouri Department of Conservation

Crisp weather has arrived, which means deer season is upon us. The Missouri Department of Conservation and the Conservation Federation of Missouri are encouraging “Share the Harvest”. It’s a program which allows hunters to feed hungry Missourians with deer meat. Lindsey Grojean spoke with Russell Duckworth, the Protection Regional Supervisor at MDC about how people can hunt to help.

So tell me about the "Share the Harvest" program.

Lindsey Grojean/KRCU

Dicamba, an active ingredient in several herbicides produced by Monsanto, has some farmers frustrated by its volatility after the 2017 crop season. While many farmers' fields have benefited from the use of dicamba, it comes at a cost to neighboring fields that have been damaged by it drifting onto planted crops that aren’t equipped to handle it. Missouri Department of Agriculture director Chris Chinn explains the actions they’ve taken to benefit both sides of the issue.

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