Agriculture

Agriculture

Parks and Recreation Department, City of Cape Girardeau

This Saturday is Earth Day, and the Cape Girardeau Parks and Recreation Department will be hosting its annual Friends of the Parks Day and Great Cape Cleanup. Parks Division Manager, Brock Davis, says they’ll be beautifying the entire city, come rain or shine.

 

Brock explained, “Our central location is Capaha Park; that’s where a lot of our projects will be hosted. We do projects on Broadway, downtown, we’ll be scattered all the way to the Jaycee golf course, the Osage Center, Cape Splash, pretty much all over.”

 

Courtesy of the Missouri Department of Conservation

I’m here with Candice Davis from the Missouri Department of Conservation, and over the past decade she says that the Missouri Department of Conservation has seen a rise in the black bear population, which is giving them the opportunity to do some research. Tell me about it Candice.

Courtesy of Old Town Cape, Inc.

 

  

Old Town Cape’s Riverfront Market is planning its 2017 Season. A vendor’s meeting will be held on Tuesday, Feb. 28 at 6 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church in Cape Girardeau.

Valerie Pender, the events coordinator at Old Town Cape, said they’re reaching out to potential vendors within 100 miles of the Cape Girardeau Region.

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson/KRCU

Nowadays we can improve just about anything, from the smartphone in our pocket to the latest gaming system. Even basic things like plants are no exception. For roughly six decades Dave Niswonger has been improving the appearance of plants. He’s hybridized everything from daylilies to daffodils. But his speciality are irises, of which he’s introduced nearly 300 varieties.

 

“It’s partly an art as well as being scientific knowledge in breeding,” Niswonger said. “You just get a sense of what a certain plant has to offer in a cross.”

(Amy Mayer/Harvest Public Media)

Peggy Fogle and her dog, Abe, walk among rows of aronia berry bushes on the family property outside Carlisle, Iowa. Plants on the ends of rows are smaller from years of being nibbled by deer and rabbits. But on nearly nine acres, filling four separate fields, the bushes are reaching maturity, eight years after Fogle and her husband decided to put in their first ones.

“We had looked for something organic, sustainable, native to the area, low-maintenance,” Fogle says, “that could be done here to provide a secondary income and be a healthy alternative.”

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