Education

Education

There is good news for some college graduates in New York: if you graduated after December 2014 from a school in the state, make less than $50,000 a year and fit some other criteria, you can now apply to have the state pick up your student loan payments for up to two years. It’s called the Get on Your Feet Loan Forgiveness Program.

One of the first graders in Lori Williams’ classroom is clearly restless during the students’ morning community circle.

As the children discuss their weekly goals, how to be a good citizen and what integrity means, the young girl is distracted. She wriggles and shifts, pulls both arms through a shirt sleeve and eventually checks out, turning her back to the group and walking her hands up the chalkboard.

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson/KRCU

Protests by African-American students at the University of Missouri sparked a trend of student led protests pressuring universities into difficult conversations on race and diversity, while ultimately breaking the barrier of disconnect between the administration and the students.

 

However, this was nothing new for the students at Southeast Missouri State University who recently held their own protest in support of the students at MU. But this protest came with a twist. The president protested, too.

 

When Ralph Hargrow arrived at Washington University from his home in the East Coast in 1969, he was part of a growing group of black students on a campus going through the same kind of drastic change that was hitting the nation as a whole.

The previous December, a group of black students had confronted Chancellor Thomas Eliot in his office in stately Brookings Hall and presented demands that later came to be known as a “Black Manifesto.”

Eric Westervelt of the NPR Ed team is guest-hosting for the next few weeks on Here & Now, the midday news program from NPR and WBUR.

Now that President Obama has signed the new Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, a big question for many educators is: Will the changes help the populations most in need of better schools: students of color, students with disabilities and low-income students?

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