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With more job opportunities, Southeast’s Cyber Security program expands, and now has sixty-five students.
Southeast Missouri State University / KRCU

The job market for cyber security experts continues to grow, and so does Southeast Missouri State University’s program in this field.

St. Francis Medical Center hosted the ninth annual Pink Ribbon Breast Cancer Awareness Luncheon in Cape Girardeau this Wednesday.
Samantha Rinehart / KRCU

St. Francis Medical Center hosted the ninth annual Pink Ribbon Breast Cancer Awareness Luncheon in Cape Girardeau this Wednesday.  Nearly three hundred physicians, supporters, and survivors attended.

Notable Cape Girardeau citizens such as Mayor Harry Rediger and prominent St. Francis Medical Center physicians volunteered as wait-staff.

Proceeds from the luncheon go to Dig For Life, which provides free mammograms for uninsured women. It is also part of the St. Francis “Pink Up Cape”.

Google made cost-cutting deals to place their Google Fiber service in Kansas City. The Kansas City Star's Scott Canon reports the city made a similar deal with Time Warner and is negotiating one with AT&T.

Woman Arrested For Selling Drugs At Daycare

Oct 3, 2012
 Keisha McReynolds was charged with Distribution of Controlled  and Endangering the Welfare of a Child after selling hydrocodone at the daycare.
Instant Vantage / Flickr

A woman is in Cape Girardeau County Jail after selling drugs at a Cape Girardeau daycare.

Keisha McReynolds is being charged with Distribution of a Controlled Substance and Endangering the Welfare of a Child.

McReynolds allegedly sold 16 hydrocodone pills to an undercover officer on September 26 at Beautiful Beginnings Daycare.

At least eight children were allegedly under McReynolds’ care at the time of the undercover operation, according to the prosecutor’s probable cause statement.

McReynolds’ bond was set for $100,000.

National Banned Book Week celebrates the right to choose your own censorship on books.
Fliokr[DML East Branch] / KRCU

The Cape Girardeau Public Library is fighting censorship through the thirtieth annual national Banned Book Week, sponsored by the American Library Association.

To celebrate Banned Book Week the library created a display of banned books, which include Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird,” Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Tom Sawyer,” and Daniel Keyes “Flowers for Algernon.” Books are switched periodically throughout the week to showcase different banned books.

The library’s Paula Featherston says that the purpose of Banned Book Week is to promote freedom to read.

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