Alex Heuer

Alex Heuer joined St. Louis Public Radio in 2012 and is a producer of St. Louis on the Air. Alex grew up in the St. Louis area. He began his public radio career as a student reporter at Tri States Public Radio in Macomb, Ill. and worked for a time at Iowa Public Radio.

Alex graduated summa cum laude from Western Illinois University with a degree in history and earned a teaching certificate in social studies. In 2016, he earned a Master of Public Policy Administration with a focus in nonprofit organization management and leadership from University of Missouri-St. Louis. He has won local and national awards for reporting and producing and his stories have been featured nationally on Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Over the past few years the world is producing 17 percent more food, yet one billion people go hungry.

That’s a conundrum that is the focus of a panel discussion Thursday night at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center titled, “The Future of Food in a Wealthier, Warmer World."

“It’s an interesting conundrum,” said Allison Miller, associate professor of biology at Saint Louis University. “We have a major challenge with feeding people but also conserving vibrant, healthy ecosystems.”

This interview will be on "St. Louis on the Air" at noon on Wednesday; this story will be updated after the show. You can listen live.

For more than 10 years, Winter Opera Saint Louis has filled what once was a void in St. Louis’ opera scene – no opera performances during the winter months.

Democrat. Republican. Independent.

Over the course of his life – and in that order – Ken Stern has identified politically as all three.

After experiencing a cholera outbreak and the Great Fire, 1849 was a difficult year for St. Louis. In addition, the city struggled to keep up with population growth. The U.S. Census shows the population of St. Louis nearly tripled between 1840 and 1850 from 35,979 to 104,978 residents.

Workplaces and institutions are implementing un-bias trainings to promote inclusivity. According to Kenneth Pruitt, director of diversity training at Diversity Awareness Partnership (DAP), training without follow-ups or contextualization can backfire.

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