Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Pope Francis met with a group of Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh on Friday, offering them blessings and hearing their stories — and specifically mentioning the Muslim minority by name, something he avoided doing during his visit to Myanmar, where Rohingya have faced persecution.

"The presence of God today is also called 'Rohingya,' " the pope said, at the end of an interfaith meeting that was held in the garden of the archbishop's residence in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

The power grid in South Australia now includes a huge Tesla battery tied to a wind farm, allowing the system to supply electricity around the clock. The battery was installed well before Tesla CEO Elon Musk's 100-day guarantee lapsed — and just in time for the start of summer.

"This is history in the making," South Australia Premier Jay Weatherill said of the battery system, which sits next to wind turbines at the Horndale Power Reserve.

Walmart has removed a controversial T-shirt with a simple message — "Rope. Tree. Journalist. SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED" — from its website, after the Radio Television Digital News Association sent the largest retailer in the U.S. a note flagging the shirt's message.

As RTDNA said, the shirt was being sold by Walmart with a company called Teespring acting as a third-party seller. The retailer removed the shirt within one day of being notified.

The U.S.-led military coalition has marked a string of successes in its fight against ISIS, including the liberation of Raqqa, Syria, and Mosul, Iraq. But the force says that its artillery and airstrikes have killed at least 801 civilians in those countries since Operation Inherent Resolve began in 2014.

Matt Lauer says, "There are no words to express my sorrow and regret for the pain I have caused others by words and actions," issuing his first public response after NBC fired the longtime host of Today, its flagship morning program.

Lauer spoke after lurid details of alleged sexual misconduct emerged in both Variety and The New York Times, ranging from inappropriate remarks to sexual assault — and a door in Lauer's office that he could lock by pressing a button at his desk.

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