Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs

Host, To Your Health

Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs is an instructor and the director of health communication for Southeast Missouri State University’s Department of Communication Studies. She writes for special publications of The Southeast Missourian and is the founder of Jimmy’s Friends, a student volunteer organization that provides social support to hospitalized children and their families. 

Ways to Connect

Flickr User Arlington County (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)

Hospitals are where we go when we are in need of treatment and healing. But that healing touch comes with a chance of spreading a potentially fatal infection: c. diff colitis.

This is clean hands week and a good time to talk about c.diff, a dangerous bacterial infection of the colon that can be easily transmitted, especially in hospital settings.

flickr user Chris Yarzab (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

What if when we talked about kids going “back to school” we considered their actual backs and their spinal health?

September 20 is Backpack Awareness Day.

flickr user Salim Virji (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)

Alex Haley once said, “Nobody can do for little children what grandparents do. Grandparents sort of sprinkle stardust over the lives of little children.”

Grandparents Day is Sunday, September 10. While there may be plenty of hand drawn cards and special presents given to them on this day, grandparents can be provided gifts in the form of health benefits all year long through regular interaction with their grandchildren.

Photo credit: Dialysis Technician Salary

When it comes to cancer treatment, one size does not fit all. KRCU's To Your Health host Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs recently sat down with Dr. Ryan Fields, Associate Professor of Surgical Oncology at Washington University School of Medicine and the Siteman Cancer Center to discuss individualized cancer treatments, like the one that recently worked so well for President Jimmy Carter.

INTERVIEW HIGHLIGHTS

 

Tells us more about how each person's DNA can be taken into account when determining the best cancer treatment

Shingles

Aug 30, 2017
flickr user Mike Mozart (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

Many of our listeners came of age before there was a chickenpox vaccine. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that studies show that more than 99% of Americans aged 40 and older have had chickenpox, even if they don't remember getting the disease. But once we got done with the fever, blisters, scabs and a week off from school, the varicella virus wasn’t done with us.

I had chicken pox in second grade. The shingles vaccine lies in my future.

Pages