Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs

Host, To Your Health

Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs is an instructor and the director of health communication for Southeast Missouri State University’s Department of Communication Studies. She writes for special publications of The Southeast Missourian and is the founder of Jimmy’s Friends, a student volunteer organization that provides social support to hospitalized children and their families. 

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We all know the gifts that get mocked this time of year…fruitcake, another tie for dad, socks…we may have previously considered a health and fitness gift on the naughty list too. After all, what exactly was the gift giver implying? However, as Christmas quickly approaches, many might be hoping to find a fitness tracker under the tree. 

Flickr user Steve Labinski (

How common is the common cold?According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in the course of a year, people in the U.S. suffer 1 billion colds. But, when you’re coughing, sneezing, and miserable do you need a doctor?

Sometimes people are unsure if they have the flu, bronchitis, pneumonia...or just the common cold. To avoid an unnecessary trip to your healthcare provider and to prevent the overprescription of antibiotics, it helps to understand the difference between these illnesses.

Official website

Americans have been able to enroll or re-enroll in health care plans for 2018 on the federal marketplace, since November 1. Enrollment will close on December 15. This will be the shortest open enrollment period since the Affordable Care Act marketplaces began.

You have about three more weeks to get signed up for health insurance if you don’t get coverage through your employer, your parents, or a government plan, like Medicaid or Medicare.

Flickr user Ron Mader (

In the book "Soul Service," Christine Cowgill states, “Death should not be viewed as a medical failure but as a natural conclusion to life.”

November is National Hospice and Palliative Care Month.

Flickr User KOMUnews (

Did you get your flu shot? It’s not too late.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention state that while influenza vaccination should begin soon after vaccine becomes available, usually in October, as long as flu viruses are circulating, vaccination should continue to be offered even in January or later.