Candice Davis

Host - Discover Nature

Candice Davis is the host of Discover Nature on KRCU and a media specialist for the Missouri Department of Conservation. Her goal is to help people to discover nature and learn to appreciate the many outdoor opportunities Missouri has to offer. Candice knows that people who spend time in the outdoors are generally less stressed, more thankful, healthier and more successful in life. Children who spend time outdoors have better grades and are more physically active. It’s Candice’s goal to inspire Missourians to discover nature in their everyday lives through stories of butterflies, elk, tupelo trees, alligator gar and other marvels of nature on KRCU’s Discover Nature program.

Ways to Connect

Great Horned Owl

Nov 29, 2015
Missouri Department of Conservation. / KRCU

November 29 - December 5

Discover Nature this week as Great Horned Owls begin to court. These large, nocturnal birds occur in deep forests, open areas with small woodlots and sometimes in urban areas.

According to the Missouri Department of Conservation, Great Horned Owls initiate nesting earlier in the year than any other Missouri native bird.

Natural Centerpieces

Nov 22, 2015
Missouri Department of Conservation. / KRCU

November 22 - November 28

Discover Nature this week by including nature in your holiday festivities.

Ever notice how even the most pricy centerpiece for a holiday table is usually made to represent nature? You can do the same thing – minus the price – and build a family tradition at the same time.

Candice Davis

Discover Nature this week and a natural mystery called lichen.

"United we stand, divided we fall". And so it is with lichens.

A lichen is made up of two unrelated organisms: a fungus and an algae. If the fungus and the algae were divided, the lichen would no longer exist. 

The fungus gives the lichen form and shape -- it also holds water and slows evaporation. The algae, a green plant, provides food for the fungus.

Lichens look like nature's living carpet and are often seen covering rocks and trees in Missouri's Ozark region.

Missouri Department of Conservation

November 6 - 12  

Discover Nature this week and the value of a rodent.

Though some folks scream and climb the highest point possible when they see a rodent,  there isn't a reason to avoid native rodent species according to the Missouri Department of Conservation.

The term "rodent" may raise images of disease-infested vermin living in garbage-strewn alleys. Actually, most of the negative images arise from two unwelcome imports -- the house mouse and the Norway rat. These old-world immigrants are not typical of native rodents, though. 

Missouri Department of Conservation. / KRCU

November 1 - November 7

This week we can Discover Nature through conflict management.

Fox and Gray squirrels are among the most commonly observed Missouri animals. Because they populate as many towns and cities as they do forests, conflicts occur year-round when humans and squirrels live in close proximity. This time of year, squirrels look for a warm place to avoid the cold weather, and unfortunately they’ll often choose an accessible attic as their favorite shelter.