Candice Davis

Host - Discover Nature

Candice Davis is the host of Discover Nature on KRCU and a media specialist for the Missouri Department of Conservation. Her goal is to help people to discover nature and learn to appreciate the many outdoor opportunities Missouri has to offer. Candice knows that people who spend time in the outdoors are generally less stressed, more thankful, healthier and more successful in life. Children who spend time outdoors have better grades and are more physically active. It’s Candice’s goal to inspire Missourians to discover nature in their everyday lives through stories of butterflies, elk, tupelo trees, alligator gar and other marvels of nature on KRCU’s Discover Nature program.

Ways to Connect

Zebra Mussels

Jun 26, 2016
Missouri Department of Conservation. / KRCU

June 26 - July 2

Discover Nature this week as you help to stop one of Missouri’s Most Unwanted invasive species, the zebra mussel.

Zebra mussels are fingernail-sized, black-and-white striped mollusks native to the Caspian Sea region of Asia. Over the next several decades, zebra mussels could spread to other freshwater locations in Missouri and throughout North America.

You can help prevent the spread of zebra mussels by observing the following "clean boating" suggestions when transporting your boat.

Missouri Department of Conservation / KRCU

Discover nature this week and take the sting out of summer.

The perception that stinging insects are instinctively aggressive at any time and place is wrong, and blinds us to the role they play in nature's balance. Many stinging insect species are essential for the pollination of fruits, vegetables and flowers. Others are important predators of pest insects that eat both wild and cultivated plants. 

Belted Kingfisher

Jun 12, 2016
Missouri Department of Conservation / KRCU

Discover nature this week in the belted kingfisher.

If you’ve spent much time along Missouri’s streams, you’ve probably heard the chattering call of the belted kingfisher. Missouri Department of Conservation biologist, Danny Brown, wrote about the belted Kingfisher for Missouri’s Conservationist Magazine.  He described the bird as one of Missouri’s avian jewels, which you can see for yourself this summer if you keep watch along Missouri’s streams.

Missouri Department of Conservation. / KRCU

June 7 - June 13

Discover nature this week as snapping turtles lay their eggs deep in the sand.

Turtles are generally harmless. Those that live in water eat plants, crayfish, snails, insects, and carrion. They are an important part of the lifecycle in any body of water.

Alligator snapping turtles live only in the few natural aquatic habitats remaining in Missouri’s Bootheel. It’s the largest species of freshwater turtle in the world and is said to be very shy.

Common snapping turtles are found in rivers, streams, ponds and lakes throughout Missouri.

Missouri Department of Conservation. / KRCU

May 31 - June 6

Discover nature this week and be on the look-out for a glimpse of red fox kits hunting with their parents.

There are two species of foxes in Missouri - the red and the gray fox. Red foxes prefer the borders of forested areas and adjacent open lands while gray foxes live in wooded areas and fairly open brush land.

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