Colin Dwyer

Not long after Daphne Caruana Galizia pulled out of her home in northern Malta on Monday, the journalist's car erupted in a blast that sent her flying across a nearby field. The victim of an apparent car bombing, Caruana Galizia was dead immediately.

But the hard questions stirred by her murder — and by the journalism she left behind — are unlikely to fade as quickly as those flames.

The initial numbers were staggering — and they grew ever more devastating as rescue workers sifted through debris: More than 300 people dead. At least 300 people injured. A blast area the size of "two or three football fields," as one witness told The Guardian.

Updated at 11:40 p.m. ET

Hurricane season isn't through with us yet.

Kim Davis has taken her fight against same-sex marriage far beyond the borders of her native Kentucky lately — far beyond even U.S. shores. The Rowan County clerk, who was jailed briefly in 2015 for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, headed to Romania this week to push for a change to the country's constitution.

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