Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

The first suspect charged in the 2012 Benghazi attacks has been sentenced to 22-year prison term for his role in the deaths of four Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens. Libyan militant Ahmed Abu Khatallah received his sentence for conspiracy and providing support for terrorism Wednesday in Washington, D.C.

District Judge Christopher Cooper's decision caps a winding legal saga for Khatallah, who was captured in Libya by American forces in 2014.

Many in Spain believe the practice began as early as 1939, the year the dictator Gen. Francisco Franco came to power: newborns taken without their mothers' consent — often even without their knowledge.

Typically, when a headline pairs the words "police" and "detain," it's fair to assume those police officers did the detaining. It's in their job description, after all.

But what unfolded early Sunday in the Mexican state of Michoacán wasn't exactly typical.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of people gathered Saturday in Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, bearing flags and seeking a glimpse of a reformist leader whose tenure is just months old. Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed was in the central Meskel Square to deliver a speech — but not long after he finished, a deadly blast unraveled the crowd.

Just about 10 days ago, Katie Arrington was celebrating a hard-fought electoral win. The conservative South Carolina state lawmaker had dealt longtime incumbent Rep. Mark Sanford a surprising defeat in the state's congressional GOP primary.

Now Arrington, 47, is in the hospital facing quite another kind of fight.

A friend had been driving the U.S. House hopeful Friday night when their car was struck by a vehicle driving the wrong direction on the highway, according to her spokesperson.

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