Frank Nickell

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Frank Nickell is a history professor at Southeast Missouri  State University. 

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Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the largest tree in Charleston, Mo., was cut down. The giant cottonwood was said to be the largest and most loved tree in the city. Legend has it that the tree was fully grown when Missouri became a state in 1821 and that it witnessed the founding of the town in 1837.

But by 1933, Charleston had expanded and grown around the mighty cottonwood and it stood squarely in the center of State Street, directly behind of the home of Edwin P. Deal, a prominent resident and town historian.

The SEMO Safari

Aug 8, 2017

 

It seems like almost yesterday that Denver Wright sought to bring a bit of Africa to the veldt of Southeast Missouri. The owner of a specialty company in St. Louis and a member of the Brentwood Board of Education, Wright inherited two lions from a small circus that simply ran out of money.

Challenged by the expense and difficulty of maintaining two grown lions, unable to give them away, Wright came upon the idea of releasing them and then hunting them in a real live safari.

Taft Day

Aug 1, 2017
President Taft was the first chief-of-state to visit Cape Girardeau.
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like almost yesterday that President William Howard Taft visited Cape Girardeau. His purpose was to promote the deepening and stabilization of the Mississippi River channel.

It seems like Almost Yesterday that a twenty-two foot tall fiberglass statue of an Indian chief was placed on the top of Houck Stadium in Cape Girardeau. At the time, Southeast Missouri State athletic teams were known as The Indians, and for nearly a decade the giant figure greeted those who attended sporting events at Houck Field or Houck Field House.

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Miss Eliza Ann Carleton began a log cabin college north of Farmington, Missouri. Her goal was to establish a college of high quality for the young people of the region.

Born and raised in a prominent Virginia family, Miss Carleton moved to Missouri in 1843 at age 17 to be close to her uncle Henry Carleton. Her family had provided her with an excellent education, and she had visited some of the most famous college of her native state.

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