Marissanne Lewis-Thompson

Feature Reporter

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson joined the KRCU team in November 2015 as a feature reporter. She was born and raised in Kansas City, Missouri, where she grew up watching a lot of documentaries on PBS, which inspired her to tell stories.

In May 2015, she graduated from the University of Missouri with a Bachelor of Journalism degree in Convergence Journalism. Marissanne comes to KRCU from KBIA, where she worked as a reporter, producer and supervising editor while covering stories on arts and culture, education and diversity. 

Photo credit: Harrie van Veen

Since U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the Trump administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA, it has been met with criticism, protests and pending legal action. The program gives legal protections to children who grew up in the United States, but were brought to the country illegally by their parents.

 

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson/KRCU

Sally Modde was just 9-years-old in 1941 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor during World War II. Many young men from her tight-knit community in Perryville were sent over to fight, some of which were her own neighbors. Like her next door neighbor with four sons who all went in at the same time. Sally tells Dear Heartland about the moment one of the brothers who was a pilot flew a B-29 bomber over her Perryville home with a special message.

 

KRCU's community project Dear Heartland shares your stories about life in southeast Missouri.

Marissanne Lewis-Thompson/KRCU

The new exhibition “Reconstructed/Reconceptualized” examines the link between the banjo and African string instruments. Ahead of the exhibition’s opening at the Rosemary Berkel and Harry L. Crisp II Museum, KRCU’s Marissanne Lewis-Thompson spoke with its creator Najjar Abdul-Musawwir, an associate professor of fine arts at Southern Illinois University to find out exactly what that link is.

INTERVIEW HIGHLIGHTS

On what the link is between the banjo and African string instruments

GPPC 52

Sep 1, 2017

 

On this week’s episode of KRCU’s Going Public, Dr. Ryan Fields, associate professor of Surgical Oncology at Washington University School of Medicine and the Siteman Cancer Center joins us  to talk about individualized cancer treatments, like the one that worked so well for President Jimmy Carter. And later on in the show, we’re taking a look at the new exhibition “Reconstructed/Reconceptualized,” which examines the link between the banjo and African string instruments with, Najjar Abdul-Musawwir, an associate professor of fine arts at Southern Illinois University.

GPPC 51

Aug 25, 2017

On this week’s episode of KRCU’s Going Public, earlier this summer, a Missouri woman died after being bit by a tick. It appears to be a case of Bourbon virus, discovered just 3 years ago and which scientists still know almost nothing about. Then, a Springfield, MO couple is working to raise awareness and funding after their four-year-old son was diagnosed with a rare disorder. And later on in the show we’re sharing some of the latest stories from a community project “Dear Heartland”.

 

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