Alt.Latino

Fridays 8:30PM

Every week, Alt.Latino introduces listeners to new alternative Latin music, including diverse genres such as cumbia, Mexican garage rock, Panamanian rap, heavy metal mariachi and many more boundary-blurring sounds from around the world. In addition to music, Alt.Latino features interviews and insightful conversation about Latin events and culture.

Hosts Felix Contreras and Jasmine Garsd's discussion of music and culture reflects their experiences as Latino immigrants (third and first generation, respectively), and is informed by Felix's long career covering Latin music and culture for NPR, NBC and Univision. Alt.Latino listeners actively contribute to these conversations and share their thoughts on music, politics, literature and cultural identity via Facebook and Twitter.

Jasmine and Felix are also frequently heard on NPR's news programs, where they speak to millions of listeners about the latest in Latin alternative music and the experiences of Latinos in the United States and abroad vis-á-vis music.

Ways to Connect

"'Freedom Is Free' is a move to unravel our minds of fear from the powers that be and replace it with self-empowerment. FREEDOM must be restored to what it has always been: controlled by no person and subject only to the infinite flow of the elements. While we are here on Earth, we should rejoice in its worth."

The Parisian-Cuban duo Ibeyi is about to break the silence since their debut album in 2015 with a new album, Ash, expected on September 29.

They entice us with a new single/video, Me Voy, that also features the Grammy Award winning rapper from Spain, Mala Rodriguez.

In this session, you've got a front row seat at a Latin Roots concert by Colombian ensemble Tribu Baharú. Of course, you're not gonna need that seat — this isn't exactly a band that inspires sitting down.

Tribu Baharú plays its own version of champeta, a style that originated in African communities on the Caribbean coast of Colombia. It's high octane music in motion — you'll hear what I mean in the band's performance at Nuevofest this past July, which you can hear in the player above.

Activist, hero, rebel, icon; those are just of the few of the adjectives often used in front of Dolores Huerta's name. They are well-deserved — for her part as a co-founder of a '60s labor movement, standing up for the rights of farm workers in this country, Dolores Huerta was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama in May of 2012.

The village of El Clavo lies just an hour bus-ride from the Venezuelan capital of Caracas, practically hidden in the lushness of the jungle. Centuries ago, the settlement was founded by rebel Africans who set up secret free communities deep in the brush of the region.

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