Missouri News

Updated 3/12/18, originally broadcast 3/10/16

Love it or hate it, Daylight Saving Time began over the weekend. Across the country, people lost an hour of sleep in exchange for longer days through the summer. Is it worth it?

The Democratic Director of Elections for St. Louis County, Eric Fey, is traveling to Russia this week as part of an intergovernmental group that will observe the presidential election March 18.

Fey is one of 420 short-term observers with the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe. The OSCE, a group with 57 member nations, has observed elections since the early 1990s to help ensure free and fair elections.

Over the last decade, Fey has served as an observer in Ukraine, Belarus, Macedonia, Canada, Sri Lanka, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. He said having an international organization observe the electoral process keeps governments accountable.

Students across the St. Louis region are planning school walkouts this week as part of a national call for improved school safety and tighter gun-control measures.

Students at more than a dozen schools in the area are planning events Wednesday morning in response to the mass school shooting that took place in Parkland, Florida, on Feb. 14. That’s left school officials to figure out the best way to respond: should they support student involvement and civic engagement, or should they enforce school rules?

Women make up 14 percent of the U.S. military as well as a full quarter of the veterans who are pursuing a college education upon returning home from service. In the St. Louis area alone, evidence of their significant presence isn’t hard to come by.

On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, host Don Marsh talked with three local Army veterans about that growing force and about how St. Louis’ student veterans are collaborating as they plan for this year’s Student Veterans Week festivities set to begin March 17.

House and Senate leaders are working on getting some key priorities wrapped up before lawmakers leave in a week for legislative spring break.

This week, the House sent 20 bills to the Senate, while the upper chamber sent 21 to the House. But the lower chamber held off on sending one bill crucial to the Republican agenda. That measure would do away with Missouri’s prevailing wage, which mandates that non-union workers hired for public projects must be paid the same amount as union members.

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