To Your Health

Flickr user Stewart Butterfield (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

The British comedian Jo Brand once remarked, “anything is good if it is made of chocolate.” But can anything made of chocolate also be good for you? Would you like to feel less guilty about the chocolates you ate on Valentine’s Day?

Flickr user Zorah Olivia (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

It might start off seeming like the comments come from a caring place. “Please don’t wear that shirt when we go out. I love you so much, I can’t stand it when other guys look at you.” But soon, it escalates to verbal and physical abuse or digital dating abuse, where one partner  reads the other’s text messages and wants access to the passwords for their e-mail and social media profiles.

February is teen dating violence awareness month.

flickr user LÊ VĂN THẢO (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)

Have you ever been told you needed to raise your cholesterol and thought, “but, wait, the Cheerios commercial said I need to lower it”?

The concept of “good” and “bad” cholesterol can be confusing.The American Heart Association states the two types of lipoproteins that carry cholesterol to and from cells are low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, and high-density lipoprotein, or HDL.

flickr user mbtphoto (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/)

I can remember a big milk carton style box of Epsom salts sitting in the linen closet at my grandparents’ house. Like the canister of Metamucil in the kitchen and the denture tray in the bathroom, it seemed like one of the mysteries of senior citizens that would one day be revealed to me.  So I was surprised when after indulging in a massage recently, the massage therapist told me I should take a bath with Epsom salts that night. Didn’t I have at least another 20 years before I needed that? And wasn’t it sort of an old-timey remedy? Did it even really work?

flickr user Alisha Vollkommer https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

At Christmastime, Jack Frost nipping at your nose sounds cute. When you are shoveling snow in January, you worry about meeting his ugly cousin, frostbite.

While hypothermia, the lowering of core body temperature, is deadly, frostbite---freezing of the skin and underlying tissues--- can cause permanent tissue damage,  as well as lead to amputation and disability. The Mayo Clinic reports there are three stages of frostbite.

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