To Your Health

You’ve probably heard of the thyroid gland, but do you know what it does? Most people aren’t usually aware of their thyroids unless something goes wrong. Thyroid trouble can cause a variety of seemingly unrelated problems, including drastic changes to  weight, energy, digestion,and mood.

It’s Thyroid Awareness Month.

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Did you hear that the American Academy of Pediatrics lifted its “no screens for kids under age 2” rule? Yes, it’s true! Does this mean that kids can have unlimited screen time now? In a word? No.

It can be confusing when respected organizations change long-held guidelines. But when the AAP set this standard, it was 1999. There were no smartphones or tablets. No Facetime or Skype. So, the policies were updated to reflect these developments in technology, not because the AAP’s previous position was unfounded.

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Are you still trying to make your new year’s resolutions before the ball drops on 2017? Consider adding Meatless Monday to your list.

Meatless Monday was founded in 2003 by Sid Lerner in association with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

When we think about strength training, we often think of weight lifting and picture famously muscled people like Arnold Schwartzenegger. But, you don’t have to be a bodybuilder to benefit from this form of exercise.

The Department of Health and Human Services recommends incorporating strength training exercises of all the major muscle groups into a fitness routine at least two times a week.

The Mayo Clinic reports that strength training can help you develop strong bones, manage your weight, manage chronic conditions and sharpen your thinking.

Did you know that on average, Americans gain a little over a pound in the week following Christmas? Would it make you feel better if I told you so do Germans and the Japanese? Misery loves company. And fudge.

The New England Journal of Medicine published a study in September that found Americans aren’t the only ones who put on weight during celebratory times. But, a report in Nutrition Review suggests that pounds Americans gain can have long lasting effects: weight gain during the holiday season may be an important contributor to the rising prevalence of obesity.

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