Almost Yesterday

Almost Yesterday is a glimpse into the rich history of our region. Dr. Frank Nickell takes listeners on a journey to specific moments in time, such as the first radio broadcast on KFVS, the history of Farmington’s Carleton College, and the short-lived safari on a Mississippi River island. A gifted storyteller and local historian, Dr. Nickell’s wit and love for the past are combined with sounds and music that augment his narrative.

On Saturday, June 7, 2008, Almost Yesterday received First Place in the "Special Programs" category at the Missouri Broadcasters Association Awards Banquet in Kansas City, Missouri.

Almost Yesterday airs every Wednesday at 7:31 a.m. and 5:18 p.m.

Local support for Almost Yesterday is provided by Hutson's Fine Furniture & Mattress in downtown Cape Girardeau.

Ways to Connect

The Mud Hen Tragedy

Feb 14, 2017

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the Ohio and lower Mississippi Rivers experienced a severe flood. And, this 1937 flood occurred in January and February in the midst of cold, snow and ice.

From Pittsburgh to Cincinnati, Louisville, Paducah and Cairo the rivers reached record levels.  Desperate calls went out for volunteers to help sand bag.

Dr. Andrew Ivy, 1893 - 1978
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Andrew Conway Ivy was one of the most well-known and celebrated physicians in the world. Born and raised in Farmington, Missouri, Dr. Ivy graduated from Southeast Missouri State Normal School in 1913, where his father, Henry Ivy, was a member of the science faculty.

Christine Brewer of Grand Tower, Illinois
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Ms. Christine Brewer appeared on the stage of Shryock Auditorium in Carbondale as a featured artist in the Southern Illinois Music Festival of 2008. For Ms. Brewer this was very much a homecoming.

Southeast Missouri State University

  

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Hollywood came to Southeast Missouri. A production company headed by prominent director Roger Corman came to Charleston and East Prairie in 1961 to produce a movie based upon Charles Beaumont’s novel about race relations and school integration in the American South.

The Sikeston Train
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the University of Missouri football team achieved one of its greatest victories. The date was Saturday, November 18, 1978 and the Missouri Tigers were in Lincoln, Nebraska to play the second-ranked Cornhuskers.

Nebraska had won nines in a row, upset number-one ranked Oklahoma, and had their sights set on a national championship.

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