To Your Health

With some questionable health advice being posted by your friends on Facebook, politicians arguing about the state of the American healthcare system and a new medical study being summarized in just a sentence or two on TV---that seems to contradict the study you heard summarized  yesterday---it can be overwhelming to navigate the ever changing landscape of health news.

Every Thursday at 7:31 a.m. and 5:18 p.m., Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs provides health information you can trust. With trustworthy sources, she explores the fact and fiction surrounding various medical conditions and treatments, makes you aware of upcoming screenings, gives you prevention strategies and more…all to your health.

Local support comes from EBO MD and EBO Center for Diabetes in Cape Girardeau. They're online at DO YOU EBO.com
 

flickr user Salim Virji (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)

Alex Haley once said, “Nobody can do for little children what grandparents do. Grandparents sort of sprinkle stardust over the lives of little children.”

Grandparents Day is Sunday, September 10. While there may be plenty of hand drawn cards and special presents given to them on this day, grandparents can be provided gifts in the form of health benefits all year long through regular interaction with their grandchildren.

Shingles

Aug 30, 2017
flickr user Mike Mozart (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

Many of our listeners came of age before there was a chickenpox vaccine. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that studies show that more than 99% of Americans aged 40 and older have had chickenpox, even if they don't remember getting the disease. But once we got done with the fever, blisters, scabs and a week off from school, the varicella virus wasn’t done with us.

I had chicken pox in second grade. The shingles vaccine lies in my future.

flickr user Esther Vargas (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)

Do Johns Hopkins Cancer Center and the Mayo Clinic sound like reliable sources to you? They do to the folks who write fake health news too.

Both Johns Hopkins and the Mayo Clinic keep their media departments hopping, issuing press releases to disprove the stories they have been mentioned in. Last week on “To Your Health” I explained how prevalent fake health news has become and how dangerous it can be. This week, we will look at how to avoid it.

flickr user Esther Vargas (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)

The cough method of CPR, the danger of the HPV vaccine, cancer-causing Nutella and the Zika virus conspiracy are just a few of the most popular health related posts on Facebook. They are also dangerous because they are highly inaccurate.

According to Pew Research, 62% of U.S. adults get their news on social media. This led to “fake news” problems often cited during the last election cycle, but studies have recently confirmed that fake health news shared on Facebook is more frequently read than accurate stories from reliable sources.

flickr user Pan American Health Organization (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/)

According to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, High blood pressure, or hypertension, is one of the major risk factors for heart disease – the number-one killer in Missouri.

Many of the one in three adults who have high blood pressure, do not know even know they have it. This is how it earned the nickname, the “silent killer”: there are usually has no symptoms until serious problems develop.

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