To Your Health

With some questionable health advice being posted by your friends on Facebook, politicians arguing about the state of the American healthcare system and a new medical study being summarized in just a sentence or two on TV---that seems to contradict the study you heard summarized  yesterday---it can be overwhelming to navigate the ever changing landscape of health news.

Every Thursday at 7:31 a.m. and 5:18 p.m., Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs provides health information you can trust. With trustworthy sources, she explores the fact and fiction surrounding various medical conditions and treatments, makes you aware of upcoming screenings, gives you prevention strategies and more…all to your health.

Local support comes from EBO MD and EBO Center for Diabetes in Cape Girardeau. They're online at DO YOU EBO.com
 

The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that 40 million kids aged 5 to 14 will be keeping up the tradition of knocking on doors this Halloween. Urban legends about poisoned candy or razor blades stuck in taffy apples have made parents vigilant through the decades; however, no recorded incident of a random Halloween poisoning or razor blade incident exists.  The biggest threat to trick or treaters , according to the American College of Emergency Physicians, is actually cars. Children are four times more likely to be hit by a car on Halloween night than on any other night of the year.

Fall has arrived! The leaves are turning colors, the air is getting cool and crisp…and you’re sneezing?

Allergies don’t just occur as things bloom in the spring and summer.

Fall allergies have different triggers than spring and summer allergies, but they can be just as annoying. Ragweed is a common culprit. The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America report that 10 to 20 percent of Americans suffer from ragweed allergy or hay fever. Ragweed begins releasing pollen in late summer and continues almost until frost kills the plant.

In the early 1990s, the Susan G. Komen Foundation, Estee Lauder and Self magazine began distributing pink ribbons at events to promote breast cancer awareness.

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  

Today, most people are aware of breast cancer, but many don’t have a plan to detect the disease in its early stages and encourage others to do the same.

If you pick up two prescriptions from the pharmacy and one drug’s label says “take twice a day,” and the second one says “take every 12 hours,” does that mean the same thing? And could you take both medications together?

Unsure? You’re not alone.

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