Economy

Economy

The United Way of Southeast Missouri and the Community Caring Council sent out a community needs assessment by email to Cape Girardeau County residents as of Feb. 16. 

The two organizations partnered back in 2005 for a similar assessment, and now, ten years later, are conducting it again.

The survey samples 2,500 households to determine what components of the community are working well and where there is room for improvement.

Red Star Residents Hopeful For Neighborhood Revival

Feb 10, 2015
Jay Forness / KRCU

The Red Star community held its second meeting for the Cape Girardeau Neighborhood Development Initiative on Tuesday night.

Residents nominated community leaders and picked the name, Red Star Neighborhood Revival, for their association. Over twenty people attended the meeting at the Red Star Baptist Activity Center, growing from their first meeting last month.

Cape Girardeau Radio Shack In First Wave Of Closures

Feb 10, 2015
Jacob McCleland / KRCU

The Radio Shack in Cape Girardeau’s West Park Mall will be among the first to close its doors after the electronics retailer filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy last week.

The Cape Girardeau store is now holding a “going-out-of-business” sale and will be in the first wave of 162 stores to close by February 17. The company plans to close at least 1,784 stores by March 31.

Cherie Henson,a shopper at West Park Mall, said she’s sad to see the store close and remembers the times she would go there when her children were young.

Jacob McCleland / KRCU

A new Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market is opening in Cape Girardeau on Wednesday, Jan. 28.The store is located at 2021 Independence St. and will feature a bakery, a self-serve deli and a drive-thru pharmacy. It will be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 

“The Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market is all about providing customers an affordable grocery option close to where they live or work,” said store manager James Dodd. “We offer customers similar offerings that Supercenter does, but an easier way to get in and out, saving customers time and money.”

When Dave Peacock stepped before a crush of reporters at Union Station last week, his main purpose was to showcase the potential of a new football stadium on St Louis’ riverfront. 

Part of his pitch was economic, which is a typical tactic to gather support for expensive sports facilities. After all, a new stadium could lead to thousands of construction jobs and continued business for surrounding bars and restaurants.

But for Peacock, there were more intangible reasons for the city to pursue the project — something beyond just dollars and cents.

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