News

Stephanie Paige Ogburn/KUNC

Slaughterhouses and meatpacking plants throughout the country employ a lot of people. About a quarter of a million workers in the U.S. stun, kill and eviscerate the animals we eat. Most of those jobs are physically demanding and require few skills.

So why haven’t we started using more robots to cut up our beef?

Abby Wendle, Harvest Public Media

While consumers might seek out organic food for its purity, organic farmers have a reputation for being anything but. At least, that’s the social stigma organic corn and soybean growers face in the Midwest for having mare’s tails and pigweeds poking their raggedy heads up through the neat rows of cash crops.

Amy Mayer, Harvest Public Media

In the Midwest, agriculture can be such a strong lure that there are some farm kids without farms. Ally Babcock lives with her family in a modern subdivision in Ames, Iowa. Tucked under the home’s back deck is a tiny barn space, enough room for her sheep and rabbits.

My Farm Roots: Room To Roam

Aug 6, 2015
Abby Wendle, Harvest Public Media

The Matthew family farm, M&M&m Farms, outside of La Harpe, Illinois, looks different from the farms surrounding it. It’s not filled with neat rows of soybeans or lines of corn that’s over-my-head high in late July. The Matthew’s place is a bit more disorganized and far more diverse.

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Allen Laws Oliver of Cape Girardeau, Missouri, became the national president of the Sons of the American Revolution.

Born in 1886 when his parents, R. B. and Marie Oliver, lived in Jackson, Missouri, young Allen Oliver was educated in the local schools, at Southeast Missouri Normal School, and then, in the family tradition, received a law degree from the University of Missouri in Columbia. 

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