Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs

Host, To Your Health

Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs is an instructor and the director of health communication for Southeast Missouri State University’s Department of Communication Studies. She writes for special publications of The Southeast Missourian and is the founder of Jimmy’s Friends, a student volunteer organization that provides social support to hospitalized children and their families. 

Ways to Connect

flickr user Gabriel Caparó (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/)

When we hear the term trauma in the context of health, we often think of a trauma ward, or emergency room, for people who have have been in accidents. And it’s right that we should think of people with physical injuries, as The Encyclopedia of Healthcare Management notes the word trauma originated from the Greek word for wound. However, emotional trauma can also have physical health effects. 

flickr user Alisha Vollkommer https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

At Christmastime, Jack Frost nipping at your nose sounds cute. When you are shoveling snow in January, you worry about meeting his ugly cousin, frostbite.

While hypothermia, the lowering of core body temperature, is deadly, frostbite---freezing of the skin and underlying tissues--- can cause permanent tissue damage,  as well as lead to amputation and disability. The Mayo Clinic reports there are three stages of frostbite.

A gynecological oncologist recently lamented that women often don’t come to see him until their cancers are very advanced. Because of the hesitancy to report symptoms occurring “below the waist” and the mistaken belief that gynecological cancers are associated with promiscuity, women are literally dying of embarrassment.

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month.

flickr user Colin Dunn (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

If, like the majority of Americans, you take a daily multivitamin to make up for a suboptimal diet and promote wellness, you may want to change your routine.

flickr user LNB Photo (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

Often times we think of the havoc our pets wreak on our holiday decorations. However, we also need to consider the health risks decking the halls can cause for our pets.

We hear about poinsettias being poisonous, but mistletoe and holly are even more toxic for pets. They can cause gastrointestinal illness, as well as cardiovascular problems, according to the ASPCA. If you have a live tree, make sure your pet can’t access the water, as it is a breeding ground for bacteria.

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