Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs

Host, To Your Health

Brooke Hildebrand Clubbs is an instructor and the director of health communication for Southeast Missouri State University’s Department of Communication Studies. She writes for special publications of The Southeast Missourian and is the founder of Jimmy’s Friends, a student volunteer organization that provides social support to hospitalized children and their families. 

Ways to Connect

Flickr user Alan Cleaver (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

"Oh, you hate your job? Why didn't you say so? There's a support group for that. It's called everybody, and they meet at the bar."

Comedian Drew Carey’s gallows’ humor aside, we spend half our waking hours at work and our jobs can affect our health. Whether we are unhappy because of the workplace environment or we experience actual physical dangers at work, we might bring home mental and physical effects in addition to our paycheck.

Flickr user Toban B. (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/)

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines environment, as it relates to health, as “all the physical, chemical, and biological factors external to a person, and all the related behaviors. ”Environmental health consists of preventing or controlling disease, injury, and disability related to the interactions between people and their environment.

As we approach Earth Day, it seems like a good time to look at how our health is affected by the environment.

Flickr user Alan O'Rourke (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)

Have you ever struggled through a stressful week where tight deadlines made you grouchy, disagreements with family produced anxiety, and the number of bills in the mailbox made you blue? Then, Saturday finally arrives...and so does a big canker sore on the inside of your cheek. Could these events be connected?

Certainly, the Mayo Clinic states that emotional stress can be one of the causes of these mouth ulcers. Stress is also listed as a contributing factor to cold sores and acne. But can your mood cause health problems that are more serious?

Flickr user Carlos Reusser Monsalvez (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/)

As the seasons change, and the daily temperatures fluctuate wildly, we often hear the weather blamed for illness. But does going from warm to cold and back again actually have anything to do with whether we get sick?

The answer is...well, maybe.

While scientists have long insisted that it is a virus that makes you sick, not the weather, several recent studies have found that the weather might help that virus get a foothold.

Flickr user The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (https://www.usa.gov/government-works)

"In January, people do crazy, desperate things to get thin fast," says Dr. Linda Bacon, a nutrition professor at the City College of San Francisco, California. Experts recommend starting with small changes to your diet. Maybe now would be a good time to try that.

Today is the last day of National Nutrition Month.

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