Going Public

Courtesy of Dr. Tamara Zellars Buck

This summer’s coverage of police involved shootings triggered public outrage nationwide. Social media blew up with a slew of criticisms, some of which were targeted towards the mainstream media, ranging from stories lacking context of deeply rooted social issues to alleged race-baiting.

Now the media is having to rethink how it’s covering the news. KRCU's Marissanne Lewis-Thompson spoke with Dr. Tamara Zellars Buck, an associate professor from the department of Mass Media at Southeast Missouri State University, to talk about the challenges of diversity in the media.

Study: Reading Harry Potter Reduces Prejudice

Sep 12, 2014
-keanna- / Flickr

 

It appears that the real magic of Harry Potter goes beyond the walls of Hogwarts. A team of researchers from England and Italy published a study in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology last month demonstrating that reading the Harry Potter books reduces prejudice.

Creative Commons

The “who” part of the Farm Bill is pretty clear.

With trillions dollars of government spending up for grabs, lobbyists from all ends of the spectrum – representing environmental interests, biotech companies, food companies, farmers – flocked to Capitol Hill to find their piece of the Farm Bill pie.

From major financial institutions (Wells Fargo & Company) to Taco Bell (Yum! Brands) to Midwest farmers (the National Corn Growers Association), outside groups spent big bucks to shape national food and agriculture policy.

Of the five proposed constitutional amendments Missourians will get to vote on in August, two of them have generated little attention and virtually no controversy.  One would expand the right against unreasonable search and seizures to include electronic communications and data, while the other would create a new Missouri lottery ticket to fund the needs of veterans.

Electronic data and communications

Forty-five years ago this Sunday, Apollo 11 became the first space flight to land men on the moon.

At Mission Control in Houston, Gene Kranz was the man in charge.

Kranz spent more than three decades working for the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, serving as flight director for both the Gemini and Apollo space programs.

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