To Your Health

flickr user Veterans Health (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/)

You might see a lot of people wearing red tomorrow, and they aren’t just getting a jump on Valentine’s Day.

Because heart disease was considered “a man’s disease” but killing over half a million American women a year,  in 2004 the American Heart Association created Go Red For Women. The goal is to dispel the myths and raise awareness of heart disease & stroke as the number one killer of women. Go Red also wants  action to save more lives and was designed to empower women to take charge of their heart health.

Did you go to a New Year’s Eve Party? Can you believe that happened THIS MONTH?

flickr user Gabriel Caparó (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/)

When we hear the term trauma in the context of health, we often think of a trauma ward, or emergency room, for people who have have been in accidents. And it’s right that we should think of people with physical injuries, as The Encyclopedia of Healthcare Management notes the word trauma originated from the Greek word for wound. However, emotional trauma can also have physical health effects. 

flickr user Alisha Vollkommer https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

At Christmastime, Jack Frost nipping at your nose sounds cute. When you are shoveling snow in January, you worry about meeting his ugly cousin, frostbite.

While hypothermia, the lowering of core body temperature, is deadly, frostbite---freezing of the skin and underlying tissues--- can cause permanent tissue damage,  as well as lead to amputation and disability. The Mayo Clinic reports there are three stages of frostbite.

A gynecological oncologist recently lamented that women often don’t come to see him until their cancers are very advanced. Because of the hesitancy to report symptoms occurring “below the waist” and the mistaken belief that gynecological cancers are associated with promiscuity, women are literally dying of embarrassment.

January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month.

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