Almost Yesterday

Almost Yesterday is a glimpse into the rich history of our region. Dr. Frank Nickell takes listeners on a journey to specific moments in time, such as the first radio broadcast on KFVS, the history of Farmington’s CarlstonCollege, and the short-lived safari on a Mississippi River island. A gifted storyteller and local historian, Dr. Nickell’s wit and love for the past are combined with sounds and music that augment his narrative.

On Saturday, June 7, 2008, Almost Yesterday received First Place in the "Special Programs" category at the Missouri Broadcasters Association Awards Banquet in Kansas City, Missouri.

Almost Yesterday airs every Wednesday at 7:31 a.m. and 5:18 p.m.

The Golden Eagles Marching Band performed in front of an international audience at Super Bowl V.
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the State College Golden Eagles Marching Band became national media stars. In 1971, the 160 member Golden Eagles band was selected to perform at the Super Bowl in Miami, Florida.

The band was given an intimidating schedule - a pre-game presentation, the national anthem, and a five-and-a-half minute marching routine during the halftime.

1961
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Hollywood came to Southeast Missouri. A production company headed by prominent director Roger Corman came to Charleston and East Prairie in 1961 to produce a movie based upon Charles Beaumont’s novel about race relations and school integration in the American South.

Southeast Missouri State University / KRCU

It seems like Almost Yesterday when Professor A. C. Magill stated on February 19, 1955, that colleges are not buildings, classrooms, nor even libraries.  Colleges, in his view, consisted of people:  teachers, students and staff.

June 6, 1944
Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that American, British, and Canadian military forces invaded Adolf Hitler’s “Fortress Europa,” initiating the campaign that brought an end to World War II in Europe.

Allied commanders agreed upon a June 1944 invasion across the English Channel, the largest amphibious operation in military history, requiring 7000 ships and transports to move 135,000 Allied troops from England to the Normandy beaches.

Sue Walker

It seems like almost yesterday that George Frederick Bollinger led a contingent of North Carolinians across the Mississippi River into Missouri.  The young Mr. Bollinger had visited the small community of Cape Girardeau in 1797, established a friendship with Louis Lorimier who encouraged him to return to North Carolina and bring more settlers to the area.

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