Almost Yesterday

Almost Yesterday is a glimpse into the rich history of our region. Dr. Frank Nickell takes listeners on a journey to specific moments in time, such as the first radio broadcast on KFVS, the history of Farmington’s Carleton College, and the short-lived safari on a Mississippi River island. A gifted storyteller and local historian, Dr. Nickell’s wit and love for the past are combined with sounds and music that augment his narrative.

On Saturday, June 7, 2008, Almost Yesterday received First Place in the "Special Programs" category at the Missouri Broadcasters Association Awards Banquet in Kansas City, Missouri.

Almost Yesterday airs every Wednesday at 7:31 a.m. and 5:18 p.m.

Local support for Almost Yesterday is provided by Heartland Custom Flooring.

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the last of the unplanned and unscheduled steamboat races occurred on the Mississippi.

On the evening of September 5, 1923, the steam boat, The Capitol, went out of Cape on a moonlight excursion.

The Bald Eagle, one of the oldest river boats, was preparing for a late night departure for St. Louis.  At approximately 10:00 P.M., the Bald Eagle pulled out of Cape and headed north.  About a mile up river the two ships passed – passengers shouting, and the captains laying heavy on the whistles.

It seems like almost yesterday that “the Father of American Physical culture” was born. He was the predecessor of Charles Atlas and a number of individuals who emphasized body building and nutrition as the keys to long and healthy life.

It seems like Almost Yesterday that Ronald Reagan came to Sikeston, Missouri to serve as the speaker at the annual banquet of the Sikeston Chamber of Commerce. The year was 1965 and Reagan had only recently emerged as a national political figure following the 1964 Republican National Convention.

Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that the mechanical hobby horse came into existence. U. S. patent number 1,863,012 was filed on February 21, 1931 by J. Otto Hahs of Sikeston, Missouri.

Southeast Missouri State University

It seems like Almost Yesterday that residents of southeast Missouri became keenly interested in the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-12. The series of 19th century tremors along the New Madrid fault have been reported as the most severe in the history of North America. Stories continue to be told, true or not, that the Missouri quakes were of such force that they rang church bells in the East and caused the Mississippi River to flow backward.